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VIDEO: John Besh's Tips for New Orleans

VIDEO: John Besh's Tips for New Orleans



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December 6, 2011

By

Ali Rosen, Daily Meal Video

The August chef gives an insider look at where to eat and go in the Big Easy

John Besh's Tips for New Orleans

The August chef gives an insider look at where to eat and go in the Big Easy

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  • John Besh's Tips for New Orleans 3:10 mins

Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Recipe: John Besh’s Louisiana Speckled Trout Amandine

On my recent trip to New Orleans, I had the pleasure of tasting some incredible food, from classic po’ boys to quite elegant, Bayou-inspired cuisine. My first night there a whole gaggle of food journalists gathered at Chef John Besh’s restaurant, Lüke, a brasserie-style place with all the brasserie trimmings and a menu that drops serious hints of Louisiana cooking.

It seemed all the locals were ordering Chef Besh’s Speckled Trout Amandine, so I hopped on the bandwagon. This is a great example of a really simple dish that’s easy to prepare but has such a unique flavor that it tastes like more effort went into it. The keys are fresh fish and a very hot skillet. Oh, and comfort with large amounts of butter. The recipe is below the jump.

Unless you live in Louisiana, you probably don’t have access to Lake Pontchartrain Trout. No worry. Any Lake Trout or Brook Trout will do. Rainbow Trout, the most commonly found trout in US markets, is a different genus, but it’ll work. Rainbow Trout gets a medium score on the Blue Ocean Institute’s Guide to Ocean-Friendly Seafood and a higher score on the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. The Environmental Defense Fund’s Seafood Selector gives farmed Rainbow Trout an “eco-best” score.

Char is in the same family as Trout and can be substituted. Both are soft in texture with a delicate flake. Beyond Char, any fresh-water white fish can be prepared in this way.


Watch the video: New Orleans 4K - Worlds Longest Bridge - Lake Pontchartrain Causeway (August 2022).