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Rhubarb Chutney

Rhubarb Chutney


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Ingredients

  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel
  • 1/2 teaspoon (scant) ground cardamom
  • 4 1/2 cups coarsely chopped rhubarb (from 1 3/4 pounds rhubarb)

Recipe Preparation

  • Stir first 6 ingredients in heavy large saucepan over medium heat until sugar dissolves and mixture boils. Add rhubarb, currants, and green onions; bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer until rhubarb is tender but not falling apart, about 4 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Discard cinnamon. Cover and refrigerate chutney until cold, at least 1 hour. DO AHEAD Can be made up to 2 days ahead. Keep refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Recipe by Betty RosbottomReviews Section

  • 2 cups diced rhubarb
  • ¾ cup diced red apple
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries, or cherries
  • ¼ cup finely chopped red onion
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 2 teaspoons red-wine vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper, plus more to taste

Combine rhubarb, apple, cranberries (or cherries), onion, water, honey, ginger, vinegar and crushed red pepper to taste in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and simmer until rhubarb is tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Uncover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened, about 5 minutes more. Serve warm or cold.

Make Ahead Tip: The chutney will keep, in an airtight container, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


Home Canned Spicy Rhubarb Chutney

This spicy rhubarb chutney was one of the first chutneys I ever made - or tasted - when I grew rhubarb for the first time. Over the years I've adapted it to be spicier and use less sugar and this year I even substituted honey for part of the sugar with great results.

This is one of the things I've learned about growing your own food: you become a lot more adventurous in trying new foods because you've got to find a way to use all the food you've worked so hard to grow!

Since that first experience with chutney, I've made a couple of other types of chutney (including the awesome Addictive Tomato Chutney) and we really like how their wonderful flavors compliment any kind of meat on the menu. This chutney in particular, is spectacular with pork. Really, it's amazing how good it is with any type of pork!

One of the most often asked questions I get about chutney is how to use it. Chutney is a classic condiment for traditional Indian curries, I've found it to be a wonderful addition to salad dressings, and it makes a popular quick and easy appetizer when poured over cream cheese and served with crackers (like I've pictured).

Oh, and see those crackers? They are a cracker I made and they are SO good and pretty easy- click here for the recipe: Whole Wheat Sriracha Cheese Crackers.

This canning recipe for spicy rhubarb chutney is adapted from a recipe that ran in the Oregonian many years ago, and I've only adapted it to change the spices and use less raisins and sugar- all of which are OK to adapt and still be safe for canning, since the ratio of rhubarb, vinegar, and onion remains the same. If you're new to canning, this is a great recipe to start with - it's quick and easy. Make sure to read my Boiling-Water Step by Step Canning Tutorial before you start.


Who Is Anne Smith?

Ann Smith–keeper of the Plopping Away Rhubarb Chutney recipe–was a real character, known affectionately as Miss Marples for her direct manner and keep-out-the-rain tweed hat! She was a really canny Yorkshire homemaker as well as an all-around great mom and grandmother. This recipe has traveled happily through generations of the Smith Family, with her granddaughters Annabel and Abigail carrying on the annual tradition of making rhubarb chutney by following the lovely handwritten, now rather sticky, recipe card instructions! Her son Mike is an honored sharer of the chutney making team. She looks forward each year to using the rhubarb that was transferred from one garden to another, keeping the deemed-to-be-circa-100-year-old rhubarb on the go, and keeping the store cupboard topped up with chutney.


Rhubarb chutney

Rabarberchutney is popular in Sweden during the early summer because it is quite a light chutney, so it is often treated more like a sauce to serve with meat, especially pork.

Rhubarb grows very well in Sweden and the chutney is easy to make, so it is not surprising that many Swedes make a batch every year. This version includes some finely chopped red chilli but other flavourings are also common, such as curry and ginger, so feel free to use this as a starting point for creating your own. John Duxbury

Summary

• The colour will depend on the variety of rhubarb, so if the chutney looks too green sometimes some strawberries are added.

• This chutney is quite light, more like a sauce. For a thicker set, use 450 grams (1 lb) of sugar and boil for longer, circa 45 minutes.

• The chutney goes especially well with grillad fläskfilé (barbecue pork tenderloin). Dry the pork, lightly brush with oil, sprinkle with some salt and pepper and leave to rest for about an hour. Grill for about 5 minutes, turning regularly until browned on all sides, and the inner temperature of the thickest part of the meat is 65°C (150°F). Leave to rest for 5 minutes before carving.
• Chutney is normally stored in a cool dark place for at least 3 weeks to allow the flavours to develop. However, in this particular case the chutney is best eaten within a couple of weeks because the colour will begin to fade, although the flavour should not deteriorate.
• A garnish of a peppery leaf, such as watercress, goes very well with rhubarb chutney.

Ingredients

600 g (1¼ lb) rhubarb stalks
1 red onion
1 red chilli
1 Tbsp fennel seeds
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp addlspice berries
110 g (½ cup) raw sugar or demerara
50 ml (3½ Tbsp) apple cider vinegar
salt and pepper

Method

1. Cut the rhubarb into 1 cm (½ inch) lengths. Peel and slice the onion. Deseed and finely chop the chilli.

2. Place all the ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar dissolves.

3. Simmer gently, without a lid, for 20 minutes, stirring from time to time to prevent the mixture sticking to the pan.

4. Taste and adjust the seasoning, adding more sugar, salt or pepper if needed.

5. Spoon the hot chutney into clean glass jars or, if you might keep it for more than a couple of weeks, into hot sterilised jars.

6. Keep in a cool dark place or, once opened, in a refrigerator.

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Rhubarb and ginger chutney

Gently flavoured with aromatic spices, this rhubarb and ginger chutney is particularly good eaten with smoked mackerel pate and slices of sourdough toast.

It can be difficult to buy British seasonal produce in March and it's known as the 'hungry gap'. Stores of fruit and vegetables harvested in the autumn for winter consumption are coming to an end, while the delights of Jersey Royal potatoes and asparagus are still more than a month away.

Gloriously pink, tender rhubarb fills the gap admirably and can be used in a variety of sweet and savoury dishes as you may have seen in my recipes in the March issue of Country Livingmagazine. Sometimes there's not enough space to include all the recipes I've developed so here's a delicious rhubarb and ginger chutney for you to try.

  1. Cut out a small square of muslin, put the ginger and star anise in the centre and bring the edges together to form a bag. Tie with kitchen string.
  2. Put all of the remaining ingredients into a preserving pan or large saucepan along with the muslin bag. Heat gently until the sugar is dissolved.
  3. Bring to the boil, then simmer for about 1-1 hour 30 minutes until thickened. Draw a wooden spoon across the bottom of the pan &ndash it should leave a channel for 2-3 seconds. Pot at once in hot sterilised jars then label when cold. Store in a cool, dark place for at least a month before opening. Keeps for up to a year unopened. Once opened, store in the fridge.

Gently flavoured with aromatic spices, this rhubarb and ginger chutney is particularly good eaten with smoked mackerel pate and slices of sourdough toast.

It can be difficult to buy British seasonal produce in March and it's known as the 'hungry gap'. Stores of fruit and vegetables harvested in the autumn for winter consumption are coming to an end, while the delights of Jersey Royal potatoes and asparagus are still more than a month away.

Gloriously pink, tender rhubarb fills the gap admirably and can be used in a variety of sweet and savoury dishes as you may have seen in my recipes in the March issue of Country Livingmagazine. Sometimes there's not enough space to include all the recipes I've developed so here's a delicious rhubarb and ginger chutney for you to try.


Rhubarb and Orange Chutney

Ingredients

Rosie's Ingredient Calculator

Enter the quantity of one or more of the ingredients that you have and Rosie will adjust the quantities to match.

Method

  1. Wash and wipe the rhubarb, cut into short pieces of around 3 cms and put into a large preserving pan
  2. Add the onions, orange zest and juice, the raisins, sugar and vinegar
  3. Stir to combine
  4. Tie the spices into a piece of muslin and add to the pan
  5. Bring to the boil then simmer gently until thick, stirring regularly
  6. Remove the spice bag and pot chutney into warmed jars, sealing tightly

How long will it take to make?

How much?

Will make approx 1,8kgs/4lbs

Look after it

Leave to mature for at least two months before eating

This information is based on the standard recipe quantities and has not be updated by Rosie's Ingredient calculator


INSTRUCTIONS

Fill a small pot halfway with cold water. Place the julienned lemon and orange peel in the pot and bring to a boil. Boil for about 30 seconds, then strain the peels. Do this process two more times. Finally rinse the peels and set them aside.

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Cook the onion until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger and salt until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and add the wine, lemon and orange peel. Return to heat, and bring to a boil cook for 1 minute. Add the sugar and stir until it dissolves. Stir in half the rhubarb. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until rhubarb breaks down, about 5 minutes.

Stir in remaining rhubarb. Raise the heat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat again and simmer until the second batch of rhubarb starts to soften, about 2 minutes. Let cool completely.

Season to taste if too sweet add a few drops of lemon juice and more salt, if too tart add a bit of sugar.

Spread goat cheese on a toast point and top with chutney as an appetizer or snack.


Spring Fling: Rhubarb Chutney & More Savory Recipes

We’re teaming up with food and garden bloggers to host Spring Fling 2011, a season-long garden party. In coming weeks, we’ll feature favorite garden-to-table recipes and tips to help you enjoy the bounty, whether you’re harvesting your own goodies or buying them fresh from the market. Recently, we dove into the world of asparagus -- today, we're exploring rhubarb.

Ah, rhubarb. I learned to love this plant's bright pink stalks at an early age when they sprouted up all over my family's garden. We ate it all -- strawberry-rhubarb pie, rhubarb compote, rhubarb crisp -- everything except the savory stuff.

This year, I decided to change that. After all, it is officially a vegetable, even if I'll always be partial to rhubarb crumble. Here's are my favorite savory takes on this spring classic.

My first thought for a savory take on rhubarb: a chutney. But many rhubarb chutney recipes are still packed with sugar, drowning out the tart flavor I wanted to highlight. The recipe below uses just a little honey, and gets a kick of spice from allspice and fresh ginger.


Rhubarb Chutney

Rhubarb Chutney is a blend spices, fruit and vinegar. Serve this tangy, spicy condiment with grilled meat, fish and poultry or with cheese.

  • Author: Judy Barbe
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 35 minutes
  • Yield: 4 cups 1 x
  • Category: Sauce
  • Method: stove
  • Cuisine: Indian, American

Ingredients

  • 3 cups rhubarb, ½-inch dice
  • 1/3 cup onion, chopped fine
  • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, rough chop
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar, apple cider, rice, or red wine
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup dried cranberries
  • ¼ cup dried apricots, chopped

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a heavy-bottom 4-quart saucepan. Over medium-high heat, bring ingredients to a boil. Reduce heat to a low, simmer until chutney thickens, about 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Cool. Remove cinnamon stick.

Notes

A chutney is best when the ingredients have texture, so don’t chop the ingredients too small.



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